About us

Hello! We're Daniel and Jessie.

We consider ourselves full-time serial travellers and part time Designer/Software Developer respectively. At least, we like to think so. And so, we go on adventures around the world - sometimes for the food, sometimes for fun, but always, always for the culture.

So far our travels have taken us over to Europe where Daniel was based, but now we've started exploring various parts of Asia Pacific, such as Hong Kong and Japan.

We are huge believers in travelling comfortably with a flexible budget because after all what’s the benefit in visiting a country when you can’t afford to live to the minimum standards of a native and experience the same things. Dropping our jobs and joining the many others travelling the world like a pretend superhero just isn’t practical or sustainable.

Daniel and Jessie at the Great Wall
Daniel and Jessie at the Great Wall

We are not unlike many of you who are reading this - we have our day jobs (as a user experience designer and a software engineer) which we love/hate, we pay bills and we go grocery shopping. So we get this question a lot: how do you travel so much?!

Dearest fellow readers, The Travel Seeker is our endeavour to answering this question for ordinary people written by ordinary people, by providing tips, tricks and incredible learnings we've gained from our travels around the globe - and also because when people ask us, we can just cheekily tell them to go read our blog!

So, where have we travelled to?

At the time of writing, we have ventured to:

  • Amsterdam
  • Australia
  • Belgium
  • Canada
  • China
  • England
  • Hong Kong
  • India
  • Indonesia
  • Ireland
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Macau
  • New Zealand
  • Portugal
  • Spain

And we will soon be travelling to Vietnam, Cambodia and Thailand

Daniel

A british expat living in Sydney who spends too much time eating.

Daniel at the Terracotta Warrior Museum
Daniel at the Terracotta Warrior Museum, Xi'an

I was born into a less than-middle class British family of five. Oldest of three brothers and so credit goes to my poor mother who did a fantastic job of shaping all three of us up despite the high levels of testosterone in the house.

As a family, we never travelled much. We were always too busy working hard to make enough money to get by and deal with the domestics of life. TV was normality and travelling was reserved for the kids with money. Over time, this sense of reality started to unsettle in my mind. I felt there was something more on offer in the world, beyond the comfortable four walls and the small communal town of Burnley, Lancashire. At first, I put it down to the age I was, but as the famous saying goes “we all want what we don’t have”, so it comes as no surprise that I wanted exactly that; to simply travel the world.

The desire to seek out more of the world only got stronger as I got older and moved into a heavy travelling consulting job as an experience designer. Travelling around the globe seemed so unreachable at first, but when the unreachable became a norm at the start of my career, it no longer felt abnormal. Therein the fire grew stronger. To date, I’ve had the privilege of working in India, England, Ireland, Spain and now Australia which I’m extremely grateful for, and I don’t see that stopping anytime soon.

I hope to bring you experiences from my now-life as an Aussie expat.

Jessie

A 20 something Sydney software developer who spends too much time planning her next adventure.

Jessie at Hobbiton
Jessie at Hobbiton, New Zealand

I'm 25 years old, Cantonese, born in Hong Kong but raised in Australia in a family of four.

My parents travelled the world when they were younger. My mother would show me photos of the Pyramids of Giza in Egypt, Fushimi Inari Taisha in Japan, the Great Wall of China, the Eiffel Tower in France, the Big Ben in the United Kingdom… the list goes on. As a family, we would often go on road trips to nearby cities and townships - sometimes to explore a nearby national park, other times to go on massive family trips out to the Great Barrier Reef. Every two to three years, we would take a long holiday back home to Hong Kong, where my mum and dad took my sister and I exploring the concrete jungle. Previously being teachers of Chinese history and literature, my parents also took it upon themselves to give us a full historical and cultural lowdown wherever we went in Hong Kong and China.

Around the age of 10, I became fascinated with astronomy. I devoured each and every book I couldget my hands on in the school library. I was sorely disappointed when I realised my lack of 20/20 vision meant I could never see the world from outer space. I settled for the next best thing - learning about cultures around the world.

Perhaps it was all of these things that made me realise just how little I knew about the world I live in.

In 2015, I joined a software consultancy company where travel was normalised and reaching gold in frequent flyer memberships were no longer unattainable (one of the topics for conversation during lunch was the misery and dread of losing your membership status - such awful first world problems).

My first big trip overseas by myself was for work, all the way from Sydney to India. I spent a good 5 weeks there, and while the flight there was absolutely nightmare-ish (7 hours to Singapore, then a 7 hour layover, followed by another 7 or so hours to New Delhi and then yet another 7 hour layover to get to Pune!), I will never forget the feeling as I stepped out of the Pune International Airport. It was bustling with vans, cars, people, dogs... the list goes on.

I think at that moment, I finally understood why my mother kept urging me to travel. And since then, I’ve resigned myself to a life of seriously problematic wanderlust.

How we met

It's a pretty cheesy story, to be honest. We were both sent to India for our software consultancy work and were both inducted in the same program for 5 weeks. Many weekends were spent together: at the Maher orphanage in Maharashtra, exploring Mumbai and Mahabaleshwar, and of course, during the week, we saw each other for work and hung out together during lunch.

After lots of awkwardness and exchanging many hugs at the end of the 5 weeks together, we added each other on WhatsApp. Nine months of denial and a million hours logged on WhatsApp later, Jessie travelled to Manchester (where Daniel was based). The rest, as they say, is history.

Daniel and Jessie at Kyoto
Daniel and Jessie at Kyoto